Wishing everyone a peaceful and healthy 2019

2018 has been another cracking year for my photography, projects and development.
I’ve crossed paths with so many inspirational people who have had great stories to tell and I feel privileged to have shot images through the UK, Europe & Africa and to have continued to develop my project Give a Child a Camera

One of the most moving moments of 2018 was meeting Musa, (pictured) in Southwest Uganda.
Babyowanba Musa, an orphan living above the town of Katuna. He lives in a small house with an elderly lady who took him in. She digs in the fields every day for around 3500 UGX (Ugandan Shillings),
“We are not sure of the lifespan of Musa” says Mukagatare Jeninah, “he has HIV and it is difficult to look after”
I felt incredibly moved by the passion of the elderly lady who took young Musa into her home – for no other reason than he was on his own, by the local NGO who supplies the ARV drugs to control the health of the those suffering with the horrendous virus and lastly by young Musa, who accompanied me on my walks around the community and taught me (despite my numerous visits to Africa) a lot about living in rural Africa.

The health of young Musa is being monitored and providing he continues to take ARV drugs he should have a relatively stable life ahead – I will be revisiting Musa in 2019.

Wishing everyone a peaceful and healthy 2019

#uganda #africa #giveachildcamera #photography #newyear

Providing Photography to Rural Africa

When Julian Claxton chanced upon a rural Ugandan school, he ended up giving 25 children the gift of photography. He tells the story”

Read the story of how I am providing photography to rural Africa in the blog post I have written for Wex Photographic..

http://www.wexphotographic.com/blog/give-a-child-a-camera-providing-photography-to-rural-africa?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=julian_claxton

Wex

Rural Uganda & a laptop

With another trip to Rwanda & rural Uganda just around the corner, here is an image from last year, which was also shown at my exhibition in the summer.

Late one evening, at his home Ronald and family watched a 20 second microsoft movie on the laptop I was given to take out to him.. Watching the movie about 15 times Angel (the small child) was completely mesmerized by the animation.

15-5

Watch morning chapel in Uganda

This is a short video of the morning chapel at Eden school in rural Uganda. Living with a Ugandan family in the local community I was privileged to be welcomed into the homes and school of the local residents. One of the many highlights was the daily morning chapel service held at the school…. visit my video on Youtube to view the wonderful singing for yourself.

 

Ugandan Grandmother

“Grandmother” taken in rural Southwest Uganda 2015.

Perhaps not one of my most creative photographs, but the presence of colour on her clothing and the dignified look on her face really makes this one stand out.

This picture didn’t make it to the final cut of images for the exhibition or book, but still remains a favourite of mine

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Buy the book | Life in Rural Uganda

Thanks to all who paid a visit to my exhibition over the last couple of days and to those of you who joined me for wine and lovely canapés (thanks to Funnells for those) Monday evening.

I hope the photographs inspired you and from the point of view of the children’s work from Eden School, made your heart warm.

I’m at the Forum in Norwich until 4pm on the 8th August so be sure to pop in.
I was also on Radio Norfolk yesterday afternoon, on the Stephen Bumfrey show (around 14:30) talking about the project and featuring some superb sounds from the children as they sung aloud! fantastic! I’d encourage you to listen again if you are able to.

On another note to do with the project, exhibition and to continue the growth of the project, as well as telling a story of my time in rural Uganda I have published a photographic book.

The book features a stunning selection of my images from rural Uganda, while half the book is devoted to the photographic students of Eden School and their amazing photographs of their life.

The book is available to purchase through the link below as well as Amazon (within a couple of weeks) or if you pop into the exhibition order a copy for £25.00

Of course, proceeds from the book go towards my continued involvement in the project “Give a child a camera”

http://www.lulu.com/shop/julian-claxton/life-through-a-lens-rural-uganda/paperback/product-22301890.html

Rural Uganda & give a child a camera project

Loosing track of days (it’s lovely not having internet on a regular basis) I realise already a week has flown by for my time at Eden School in Uganda.

I’m sat in a tourist hotel using their intermittent wifi , having a break this afternoon from the hard work at the school and the pretty constant walking.

I consider myself fairly fit, but let me tell you, these hills combined with the stifling heat really take it out of one! The last few days I’ve been visiting the twenty three children who had the cameras, checking on their progress, meeting family and generally having a wonderful time.

For all of the families I was the first Muzungu to have visited them and it was a real treat, enabling me to glimpse life in rural Uganda and capture some pretty special images. I was showered with gifts, ranging from gorgeous fruit to lovely hand woven pots. While they didn’t have electricity and often lived in pretty tough surroundings, the one thing that was evident throughout was that all of the people were hardworking, extremely hospitable and as you would expect rather charming people.

The children I’ve been teaching photography too really seemed to have taken to the idea of photography. They listened intently to my teaching, appearing to grasp the principle of film, flash and subject matters. I now have 23 films to develop, which will see me going into town tomorrow on a Boda Boda (motorbike taxi) to get the film processed….

I’m rather impressed that out of the 23 cameras given out only one was not present when I visited, however this morning all the children turned up with them – I’m so pleased. The kids have taken great care of them and really cherished this opportunity.