Enjoy a coffee & immerse yourself in Africa in Norwich

The feedback for the latest installment of Give a Child a Camera continues to be extremely positive.

I’m sure one or two of my students could have promising photographic careers, Thanks to those of you who were able to attend the supporters evening on the 4th November – it was lovely to chat and explain some of the work and I’m really pleased it seems to have gone down well.

The exhibition is on until the 1st December, plenty of time to pop into the lovely Playhouse, view the work, read the stories behind the images and have a coffee – unwind, relax and immerse yourself in Africa.

 

Give a Child a Camera | Website Update

Give a Child a Camera | Ugandan children documenting their lives through photography

Project website has been updated… please share/like if at all possible. The project only functions with the kind support from people like you!

V4 – East Africa – Possibly Kenya (discussions underway!)

 https://giveachildacamera.wordpress.com/2018-project-v3/

#uganda #vso #giveachildacamera #project #africa #eastafrica#photography #teaching

Give a Child a Camera | V3 2018 | Uganda

Give a Child a Camera | V3 2018 | Uganda

I’m really pleased to announce that #Giveachildacamera returns for 2018, where I will be rolling the project out to a group of young vulnerable children on the border with Rwanda.

Give a child a camera is all about providing slightly different opportunties for children in East Africa.
After a little bit of tution the children, (who have not used cameras before) are given their cameras for around a week, where they document their lives in a fascinating fashion.

If you would like to get involved, have an old camera, laptop, equipment or wish to donate to the project please pop along to the project website  https://giveachildacamera.wordpress.com/

Julian with the photo students at Eden

Photography workshop in Suffolk

Really excited to announce I’ll be running a workshop with the folks at Access Community Trust this summer… The photography workshop is perfect for anyone with an interest in photography and is a great opportunity to produce some wonderful photographs and exhibit them locally…

Buy the book | Life in Rural Uganda

Thanks to all who paid a visit to my exhibition over the last couple of days and to those of you who joined me for wine and lovely canapés (thanks to Funnells for those) Monday evening.

I hope the photographs inspired you and from the point of view of the children’s work from Eden School, made your heart warm.

I’m at the Forum in Norwich until 4pm on the 8th August so be sure to pop in.
I was also on Radio Norfolk yesterday afternoon, on the Stephen Bumfrey show (around 14:30) talking about the project and featuring some superb sounds from the children as they sung aloud! fantastic! I’d encourage you to listen again if you are able to.

On another note to do with the project, exhibition and to continue the growth of the project, as well as telling a story of my time in rural Uganda I have published a photographic book.

The book features a stunning selection of my images from rural Uganda, while half the book is devoted to the photographic students of Eden School and their amazing photographs of their life.

The book is available to purchase through the link below as well as Amazon (within a couple of weeks) or if you pop into the exhibition order a copy for £25.00

Of course, proceeds from the book go towards my continued involvement in the project “Give a child a camera”

http://www.lulu.com/shop/julian-claxton/life-through-a-lens-rural-uganda/paperback/product-22301890.html

Norfolk schools project comes to town!

It was performance day at the Theatre Royal in Norwich yesterday as Firside Junior School, Magdalen Gates Primary School and Kinsale Junior came together to perform in front of a packed house, their inspired productions based on La Bohème, Puccini’s tale of young love

Schools project in full swing

The Norfolk Schools Project was in full swing yesterday, as Kinsale school in Norwich had their chance to impress Lynsey Docherty with their pretty impressive singing, before performing their pieces in the joint singing workshop In the afternoon. Which saw all three schools come together, working on a collaboration and individual pieces.

Every child in the group seemed enthused and it’s testament to the hard work of everyone involved that a project like this is of such benefit.

To watch the children develop from shy individuals to confident performers is really quite something.

Rehearsals for the Norfolk Schools Project

It’s that time of the year again when the Norwich Theatre Royal Norfolk Schools Project kicks into action….

I spent a rather enjoyable few hours at two of the schools today, watching the kids rehearse their creations and get in shape, as soprano Lynsey Docherty put them through their paces, ready for the singing workshop tomorrow

Ugandan children & their cameras…. great work!

The mixture of teaching, practical work (sorting various elements for the school), dealing with African suppliers and meeting so many local people has left me absolutely exhausted.

My head hitting the pillow at around 10:30pm, I stare out towards the Democratic Republic of Congo, the sky bright with stars and more often than not illuminated with distant storms. The lack of light pollution is a joy to behold, while the sound of music beats and occasionally drums ring around the mountains in the distant. Closer to home the air is filled with occasional sounds from cattle and calling of crickets.

It’s a lovely way to drift off to sleep.

Back to the school and the photography in particular, well, to be honest the 24 children who have had cameras have completely exceeded my expectations with the quality (in both technical and compositional terms) and variety of photographs they have taken. Two children in particular have produced work which is completely encapsulating. I was so nervous taking the 26+ rolls of film (I had to give a couple of extra rolls out due to ‘accidents’) to the processing lab in the nearest town.

The staff in the lab and the other photographers waiting for their prints (there are quite a few film photographers in town (not in the villages), making a living taking portrait of shots of people at their home) were rather transfixed by my project and the idea of giving children cameras to take pics of their life. “But why, they will just destroy the camera” said one middle aged man (how wrong he is!)

I returned in anticipation to see what had become of my teaching and in particular if anything had come out…. Every single child had managed to meet some form of the objectives I set, some taking great pains to really demonstrate a side of their rural life which a traveller would not normally glimpse.

Upon returning to the village, I set about organising the images and deciding on which ones I would display – due to limited space, it was agreed that a collection of the five best images from each child would be displayed in the school.
Come Monday morning, the children were in a state of excitement and amazement, pointing, laughing, showing and talking about their images.

This is what I wanted to achieve and I’m so pleased the children feel they have something from the experience.

Photography teaching has been added to the monthly timetable, I have finished some lesson plans and hope to get them printed in town later this week…The children and their families get to keep the cameras along with several rolls of film (thankfully I’ve just managed to buy some more in town) and of course an album with all their images.

They know their pictures will feature in an exhibition in the UK this summer and are excited to say the least.

Of course, there has been lots of other work going on while I’ve been here, including tons of new educational books, materials (such a benches/boards etc) water supply to the school, medical & new uniforms for those without (plus much more!)

With my time approaching the end, I’m meeting the final few parents and interested people this week, before I make the journey back to Rwanda.

Life in rural Uganda has been wonderful and I genuinely feel privileged to have spent all this time living with a Ugandan family, watching, learning and taking part in their life. I know I’ll miss them all dearly.