Waveney Rush on the Norfolk Broads

Last week was a varied time of shoots… on the Norfolk Broads, at Olympia in London and then in Tottenham in North London.. Couldn’t really get much more of a mixed bag than that!

The images below were from a shoot at Waveney Rush for BBC Countryfile magazine. Having finished an illustrated feature for the magazine I was then commissioned to also produce a ‘how to’ guide for making a drinks coaster from rushes collected from the Broads… it was easier to shoot than to make..but I do quite fancy having a go at this…

Check out the July issue of the magazine for the full feature and how to guide

In the meantime, if you fancy a visit to a real herirtage industry, I would recommend a call to Waveney rush to see if you can visit the workshop, which has to be in one of the best locations I’ve ever seen!
The company make wonderful matting, baskets and other pieces… stunning!

A Contemporary Woodturner

This illustrated feature on Contemporary Woodturner Andy Coates should be appearing in the next month or two.

I shot these images a couple of months back when I visited Andy’s workshop and gallery in Beccles.

I had never seen such delicate wood turning and craft skills before and I was completely transfixed by his style and design.

His workshop is well worth a visit! http://www.andycoates.co.uk/

Waveney Rush

In the November issue of Suffolk Magazine I get to grips with Waveney Rush Cutters…a Suffolk based company which is keeping the age old craft of rush weaving alive!

“Paddling my kayak up river on the picturesque River Waveney near Homersfield, I’m fighting against the surprisingly strong current, through the freshly cleared and cut bull rushes. The reflection of the sun bouncing off the water, the air filled with the sound of country life ticking by and the odd splash of the river as another fish gasps for air. After 15 minutes of tough paddling I finally gain sight of the rush cutters, up to their waist in the crystal clear water, pulling, cutting and tying incredibly lush looking bull rushes. The rushes are gathered together pushed down river to the next cutter, who trims, ties and forms a bolt (bundle of rushes) which are then loaded onto the metal barge. The team of three men have been busy for a few weeks clearing this stretch of the river, gradually making progress deep into the heart of the countryside “It’s been really tough” admits Paul the maintenance manager of Waveney Rush as he hauls yet another bolt onto an already fully loaded barge.”

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It’s a bit of a rush! On the river with Waveney Rush Cutters

Working with Waveney Rush Cutters!
A few weeks back I was working on an illustrated feature for a regional magazine, working with one of the few remaining rush cutting and weaving companies left in the UK.

I joined them on the river Waveney, watching them cut the bull rush, before heading back to their workshop to learn how they create simply stunning natural products!

The feature will be published in October – Watch this space!